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How sustainable is Helly Hansen ?

Helly Hansen & sustainability


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Reasonable, could be better Click here for score rapport: 8 out of 21

Sustainability summary

Brand owner: Helly Hansen ASA
Head office: Oslo, Norway
Sector: Sport & outdoor - clothing & shoes
Categories : Male, Female, Kids
Free Tags: Helly Hansen, Bags, Caps, Shirts, Pullover, Jackets, Dress, Shoes, Boots

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Helly Hansen sustainability score report

Last edited: 6 May 2013 by Mario
Last reviewed: 6 May 2013 by Mario

Questions about Climate Change/ Carbon Emissions

1 out of 4
1. Is there a policy for the brand to minimize, reduce or compensate carbon emissions? Helly Hansen has taken various policy measures to reduce CO2 emissions, such as minimizing internal travel and using energy from natural resources like water (See link, section 'Operational Goals'). Source
2. Has the brand (company) disclosed the annual absolute carbon footprint of its 'own operations' (Scope 1 & 2) and has the brand already reduced or compensated 10% of these emissions in the last 5 years? Helly Hansen states its willigness of improving the company's environmental footprint through closer cooperation with suppliers and customers, as well as improving internal processes. However, no carbon footprint or concrete actions are found on their website (see 'Overall Goals'). Source
3. Has the brand (company) set a target to reduce its absolute ‘own operations’ carbon emissions by at least 20% within the next 5 years? See remark for carbon emissions policy question 2. Source
4. Does the brand (company) also have a policy to reduce/compensate carbon emissions generated from the product supply chain that is beyond own operations (Scope 3)? Helly Hansen will work with Bluesign to improve the sustainability of its entire supply chain regarding energy usage, chemical use and emissions and water usage. However, no concrete actions are described (see link, 'Product Goals'). Source

Questions about Environmental Policy

2 out of 8
1. Does the brand (company) use environmentally 'preferred' raw materials? Helly Hansen´s Ekolab collection is made of prefered materials such as organic cotton. However, it's unclear what percentage of totale volume this represents (see link, 'Product Goals'). Source
2. Does the brand (company) use environmentally 'preferred' raw materials for more than 25% of its volume? See remark for environmental policy question 1. Source
3.  Does the brand (company) use environmentally 'preferred' raw materials for more than 50% of its volume? See remark for environmental policy question 1. Source
4. Does the brand have a clear and effective policy to avoid the use of leather that originates from cattle farms in deforestated Amazone areas? Helly Hansen does not openly communicate a policy to prevent the destruction of rainforest caused by cattle farm expansion for meat and leather production. Sustainability information should be easily accessible for consumers to make responsible choices. Source
5. Does the brand (company) have a clear and effective policy to minimize environmental pollution of chromium and other harmful substances from leather tanning processes, e.g. by waste water treatment or by vegetable tanning? Helly Hansen does not openly communicate a policy to to limit chromium and other harmful substances pollution caused by leather tanning processes. Sustainability information should be easily accessible for consumers to make responsible choices. Source
6. Is there a policy for the brand (company) to eliminate all hazardous chemicals from the whole lifecycle and all production procedures to make the clothing and footwear? Helly Hansen mentions that its Ekolab products are Bluesign certified, which means that high standards are maintained for responsible chemical and water use during production (See link, Bluesign-Pure Materials. Pure Benefit). Furthermore, Helly Hansen reports to work with Bluesign to improve the sustainability of the entire supply chain: Source
7. Does the brand (company) have a clear target to phase out PVC in their products, and has the brand already achieved a PVC phase out level of more than 90%? Helly Hansen does not report about having a plan to phase out PVC in their products. Source
8. Has the brand (company) a clear and effective policy to minimize the use of solvents based chemicals in their shoe production, and has the brand already achieved a level of average max. 40 grams of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) emissions per pair of shoes? Helly Hansen does not report about having a plan to reduce solvent based chemicals in their shoe production. Source

Questions about Labour Conditions/ Fair Trade

5 out of 9
1. Does the brand (company) have a supplier Code of Conduct (CoC) which includes the following standards: No forced or slave labor, no child labor, no discrimination of any kind and a safe and hygienic workplace? All standards are mentioned in Helly Hansen Code of Conduct (see link). Source
2. Does this CoC include at least two of the following workers rights: 1. to have a formally registered employment relationship 2. to have a maximum working week of 48 hours with voluntary and paid overtime of 12 hours maximum 3. to have a sufficient living wage? 1. No, not mentioned in specific; 2. No, nothing mentioned about working hours; 3. Specifically mentioned that wages must always be enough to meet the basic needs of employees (see section 2.7). Source
3. Does this Code of Conduct include the right for workers to form and join trade unions and bargain collectively; and in those situations where these rights are restricted under law, the right to facilitate parallel means of independent and free association and bargaining? This right is mentioned, with reference to parallel means for the situation of law restrictions (see section 2.3). Source
4. Does this labour conditions policy also apply further down the production chains, at least covering the leather production or the animal farms? Helly Hansen does not make clear if the Code of Conduct and consequent labour conditions policy also applies further down the footwear production chain, such as leather tanning or cattle farms. Source
5. Does the brand (company) have a published list of direct suppliers, that have collectively contributed to more than 90% of the purchase volume? The list most likely covers 90% of the brand’s total production. Source
6. Is the brand (company) a member of a collective initiative that aims to improve labor conditions, or does the brand (company) purchase its supplies from accredited factories with improved labor conditions? Helly Hansen is a member of ETI Norway (see 'Operational Goals'). Source
7. Do independent civil society organizations like NGO's and labor unions have a decisive voice in this collective initiative or in these certification schemes? Helly Hansen is a member of ETI Norway, which means that Labour Unions and/or business-independent NGO’s have a formal and co-decisive voice. Source
8. Does the brand (company) annually report on the results of its labor conditions policy? Members of the ETI Norway are obliged to report annually on their ethical trade progress. However, no report could be found freely on their website. Source
9. Has the brand’s labor conditions policy resulted in a ‘compliance level’ of at least 30% of the purchase volume, or a ‘monitored level' of at least 80%? Helly Hansen state that they visit the factories and subcontractors, with or without prior notice. However, Helly Hanson does not communicate any information on compliance and monitoring levels of labour conditions (See link, Code of Conduct FAQ). Source