Rank a Brand

How sustainable is Logona ?

Logona & sustainability


Logona
Well on the way Click here for score rapport: 15 out of 26

Sustainability summary

Logona has achieved the B-label. Logona is one of the more sustainable cosmetic brands. However, there are some improvements to be made.

Brand owner: LOGOCOS Naturkosmetik AG
Head office: Salzhemmendorf, Germany
Sector: Cosmetics
Categories : 
Free Tags: Logocos

What's your sustainability news about Logona?

Logona sustainability score report

Last edited: 14 July 2016 by Heinz
Last reviewed: 14 July 2016 by Mario

Questions about Climate Change/ Carbon Emissions

2 out of 4
1. Is there a policy for the brand to minimize, reduce or compensate carbon emissions? Logocos (the brand owner of Logona) implements several measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, such as using renewable energy and energy efficiency measures (see link, pages 9-14). Source
2. Has the brand (company) disclosed the annual absolute carbon footprint of its 'own operations' (Scope 1 & 2) and has the brand already reduced or compensated 10% of these emissions in the last 5 years? Logocos reduced its own operations climate footprint from 475 tons of CO2 in 2013 to 382 tons of CO2 in 2015, which represents a decrease of around 19,5% (see link, page 13). Source
3. Has the brand (company) set a target to reduce its absolute ‘own operations’ carbon emissions by at least 20% within the next 5 years? Logocos does not communicate information on total target reductions for its greenhouse gas emissions of own operations. Source
4. Is at least 25% of the electricity used by the brand (company) generated from renewable resources, such as wind or solar energy? For 2015, Logocos reports a 100% renewable energy use for its electricity consumption. However, sources and additionality of supply are not clear enough specified (see link, page 9-14). Source

Questions about Environmental Policy

12 out of 18
1. Does the brand have a policy to phase out all possible harmful substances? Logona reports to use to a large extent natural substances only, but does not use possible harmful substances like synthetic fragrances and colorings, paraffin or other petroleum products. Source
2. Does the brand refrain from using the high hazard (red coded) chemicals as listed in the Skin Deep database of the Environmental Working Group, and if still used, does the brand give scientific account for the safe use of it? Logona has a clear policy to avoid using the ‘red’ coded ingredients in the SkinDeep database, and publicly clarifies and accounts for the use of the few red listed substances. Source
3. Does the brand strictly apply the precautionary principle (=banning) for all possible harmful substances such as parabens, also when the scientific evidence for possible harm is limited, unclear or debated? See remark for environmental policy question 1. Source
4. Does the brand refrain from using any microplastics for all of its products? See remark for environmental policy question 1. Logona is 100% microplastics free. Source
5. Does the cosmetics brand completely refrain from animal testing including tests in the supply chain? Logona completely refrains from animal testing, and does not delegate this task to others. Source
6. Does the cosmetics brand refrain from using animal derived ingredients? Logona reports that its products are predominantly vegan, but it does not totally refrain from using animal derived ingredients. Source
7. Does the brand have a policy to replace petroleum-based ingredients with renewable, biodegradable ingredients? All Logona products are free from paraffin oil and other raw materials from petroleum chemistry, and mainly uses natural ingredients that are in accordance to BDIH and / or NATRUE standards. Source
8. Has the brand already achieved an overall ratio of 50% renewable, biodegradable ingredients? See remark for environmental policy question 7. Source
9. Are all the cosmetics of the brand free of organic-synthetic dyes, synthetic fragrances, ethoxylated raw materials, synthetic UV filters, synthetic preservatives, silicones, paraffin and other petroleum derived products? See remark for environmental policy question 7. Source
10. Are all cosmetics free of genetically modified materials, nanomaterials and radiated materials? Logona only uses natural ingredients according to the BDIH and / or NATRUE standard. This standard excludes the use of all mentioned materials. Source
11. Are at least 50% of the brand products certified ‘natural’? See remark for environmental policy question 7 & 10. Source
12. Does the brand use organic or otherwise environmentally certified renewable ingredients for at least 50% of its total use of ingredients? Many products of Logona carry the organic seal, but Logona is not clear about the percentage of environmentally certified renewable ingredients of its total use of ingredients. Source
13. Are at least 90% of the brand products certified ‘organic’? See remark for environmental policy question 12. Source
14. Does the brand inform users through all products about environmentally responsible use, such as dosage, water use and packaging disposal? Logona does not specify whether environmentally responsible use information are provided for its customers through all its brand products. Source
15. Does the brand (company) publish a water footprint and is there a concrete policy to minimize, reduce or compensate this footprint? Logocos implements several measures to reduce its water usage. In 2015, Logocos used 12,931 m3 of water. That is around 22% more than in 2014 (see link, page 13-15). Source
16. Does the brand (company) publish its annual material use footprint, or alternatively material footprints for each sold product, and does the brand have an effective policy in place to reduce the overall environmental impact of material use? Logocos implements several measures to improve its annual material footprint, but does not publish its annual material footprint, or alternatively material footprints for each sold product. Source
17. Does the brand (company) have clear objectives to minimize waste, by reducing, re-using and recycling, and does the brand annually report the results? Logocos publishes annually on its waste production and has reduced its waste volume between 2012 and 2014. It uses an environmental management system, for continuous optimization of all processes (see link, pages 6, 13 & 14). Source
18. Does the brand have clear objectives to minimize the environmental impact of packaging, by reducing, re-using and recycling, and does the brand annually report on these results? Logona states to use recyclable packaging materials. However, neither Logocos nor Logona report on the annual results of its consumer packaging policy. Source

Questions about Labour Conditions/ Fair Trade

1 out of 4
1. Does the brand (company) purchase tropical ingredients such as palm oil, cocoa butter, coconut oil, carnauba wax from sources (e.g. plantations) that are certified to e.g. have no child labor and no forced labour, and provide a better living standard for the farmers and workers who produce these tropical materials? Logona communicates commitment to fair trade projects and brand owner Logocos participates in the Forum for Sustainable Palm Oil (FONAP), but is not clear about the share of social certification for the tropical ingredients of its products. Source
2. Does the brand (company) purchase at least 50% of its tropical ingredients such as palm oil, cocoa butter, coconut oil, carnauba wax from sources (e.g. plantations) that are certified to e.g. have no child labor and no forced labour, and provide a better living standard for the farmers and workers who produce the tropical ingredients? See remark for labor conditions policy question 1. Source
3. Does the brand (company) purchase mined raw materials such as mica and gold from sources (e.g. mines) that are certified to e.g. have no child labor and no forced labour, and provide a better living standard for the farmers and workers who produce the raw materials, and/or is the brand equally involved in significant initiatives to achieve this? Neither Logocos nor Logona mention the topic of social risk or certification for its mined ingredients from low wage countries. Source
4. Does the brand (company) purchase at least 50% of its mined raw materials such as mica and gold from sources (e.g. mines) that are certified to e.g. have no child labor and no forced labour, and provide a better living standard for the workers who produce the raw materials, and/or is the brand equally involved in significant initiatives to achieve this? See remark for labor conditions policy question3. Source