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How sustainable is Vans ?

Vans & sustainability


Vans
Dont buy Click here for score rapport: 5 out of 36

Sustainability summary

Based on our sustainability criteria, Vans has achieved the E-label, because only a little information is published about a policy on sustainability. According to us, it's hard to see the effort Vans is making on sustainability. Therefore, more policy and transparancy is needed.

Brand owner: VF Corporation
Head office: Cypress, CA, USA
Sector: Shoes & footwear
Categories : Male, Female, Kids
Free Tags: VFC, Bags, Caps, Shirts, Pullover, Jackets, Shoes

What's your sustainability news about Vans?

Vans sustainability score report

Last edited: 24 February 2015 by Mario
Last reviewed: 24 February 2015 by Mario

Questions about Climate Change/ Carbon Emissions

2 out of 6
1. Is there a policy for the brand to minimize, reduce or compensate carbon emissions? The Vans distribution center in Santa Fe Springs, California, is among the top 25% of distribution centers worldwide for energy efficiency as rated by the Energy Star rating system. Source
2. Has the brand (company) disclosed the annual carbon footprint of its 'own operations' and has the brand already reduced or compensated 10% of these emissions in the last 5 years? VFC has reduced its climate footprint of own operations from 288,985 tons of CO2 in 2010 (see link, p.49) to 287,136 tons of CO2 in 2013 (see link, previous question). This represents a decrease of around 0.7%. Source
3. Is at least 50% of the electricity used by the brand (company) generated from renewable resources, such as wind or solar energy? VFC states to aspire to be entirely powered by renewable energy across its company. Also VFC reports, that in Germany 50%, and at its international headquarter in Switzerland 100% of renewable energy is sourced. But, the overall proportion of renewable energy sourced and whether the renewable energy purchased can be considered as additional aren't specified. Source
4. Is all the electricity used by the brand (company) generated from renewable resources, such as wind or solar energy? See remark for carbon emissions policy question 3. Source
5. Has the brand (company) set a target to reduce the carbon footprint of its 'own operations' by at least 20% within the next 5 years? By 2015, VF plans to reduce its absolute carbon emissions by only 5 percent below 2009 baseline levels. This includes value chain emissions beyond own operations. However, this goal would conclude after this year, and there is no mention of a goal beyond 2015. Source
6. Does the brand (company) also have a policy to reduce/compensate carbon emissions generated from the product supply chain that is beyond own operations? VFC evaluates the ghg impacts of its contracted factories, and is working to increase awareness of carbon use in its supplier base. For 2013 VFC reports an approximate value of 1.162,445 tons of CO2. VFC aims to reduce its supply chain emissions by 10% per units produced by 2015 (base year 2009). Source

Questions about Environmental Policy

2 out of 16
1. Does the brand (company) use environmentally 'preferred' raw materials for more than 5% of its volume? In 2013, VFC reached its goal of having 1% of total cotton used (2,000 tons) qualify as sustainable (organic, fair-trade or other sustainability initiative). For 2015, VFC set a new goal of 3 percent (6,000 tons). However, this only accounts for cotton, not all raw materials, and is below the required 5% of the company's sales volume. Source
2. Does the brand (company) use environmentally 'preferred' raw materials for more than 10% of its volume? See remark for environmental policy question 1. Source
3. Does the brand (company) use environmentally 'preferred' raw materials for more than 25% of its volume? See remark for environmental policy question 1. Source
4. Does the brand (company) use environmentally 'preferred' raw materials for more than 50% of its volume? See remark for environmental policy question 1. Source
5. Does the brand (company) use environmentally 'preferred' raw materials for more than 75% of its volume? See remark for environmental policy question 1. Source
6. Does the brand (company) use environmentally 'preferred' raw materials for more than 90% of its volume? See remark for environmental policy question 1. Source
7. Does the brand have a clear and effective policy to avoid the use of leather that originates from cattle farms in deforestated Amazone areas? Neither VFC (brand owner) nor Vans openly communicate a policy to prevent the destruction of rainforest caused by cattle farm expansion for leather production. Source
8. Does the brand (company) have a clear and effective policy to minimize environmental pollution of chromium and other harmful substances from leather tanning processes, e.g. by waste water treatment or by vegetable tanning? In the chemistry policies of VF Corporation ( brand owner) there is no policy to specific policy to limit chromium and other harmful substances caused by leather tanning processes. Source
9. Is there a policy for the brand (company) to eliminate all hazardous chemicals from the whole lifecycle and all production procedures to make the footwear? VFC recently implemented its Chem-IQ program at select factories in 2013 in order to screen more than 1,000 chemicals from 102 factories and successfully remove 68 tons of non-preferred chemicals from VFC's supply chain. Source
10. Has the brand (company) eliminated at least one suspect chemical group, such as Phthalates or Per fluorinated chemicals from its entire garment production? Neither Vans nor VFC report whether at least 1 out of 11 suspect chemical groups, such as Heathy Metals or Chlorophenols can be considered as fully phased-out in the entire production chain. Source
11. Has the brand (company) eliminated at least three suspect chemical groups, such as Phthalates or Per fluorinated chemicals from its entire garment production? See remark for environmental policy question 10. Source
12. Does the brand (company) have a clear target to phase out PVC in their products, and has the brand already achieved a PVC phase out level of more than 90%? VF Corporation (brand owner of Vans) mentions that the company "prefers that products do not contain PVC" and "the ultimate objective being a comprehensive prohibition on all PVC use". However, VF Corporation does not give a clear timeline for phasing out PVC (see link, page 21). Source
13. Has the brand (company) a clear and effective policy to minimize the use of solvents based chemicals in their shoe production, and has the brand already achieved a level of average max. 40 grams of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) emissions per pair of shoes? VFC does mention VOC's in their restricted chemical substance list. However, it is unclear what reduction levels are achieved for the footwear production (see link, page 17). Source
14. Does the brand (company) have clear objectives to minimize the environmental impact of its shipping packaging and carrier bags, by reducing, re-using, recycling and responsible sourcing of packaging materials, and does the brand annually report on these results? VFC implements sustainability purchasing criteria for its packaging materials. However, tangible aggregate results reg. its packaging materials footprint are not made public. Source
15. Does the brand (company) have clear objectives to minimize waste, by reducing, re-using and recycling, and does the brand annually report the results? Vans does not report on the specific annual results of its waste reduction policy. However, brand owner VFC implements several measures to reduce its waste streams and reports on its aggregate annual waste material footprint. Source
16. Does the brand (company) encourage the return or re-use of garments? Neither Vans nor VFC report, whether the return or re-use of garments by its customers is stimulated. Source

Questions about Labour Conditions/ Fair Trade

1 out of 14
1. Does the brand (company) have a supplier Code of Conduct (CoC) which includes the following standards: No forced or slave labor, no child labor, no discrimination of any kind and a safe and hygienic workplace? All standards are mentioned in VF Corporation's Global Compliance Principles (see page 1 & 2). Source
2. Does this CoC include at least two of the following workers rights: 1. to have a formally registered employment relationship 2. to have a maximum working week of 48 hours with voluntary and paid overtime of 12 hours maximum 3. to have a sufficient living wage? 1. Not mentioned; 2. No, maximum working week of 60 hours, not clear whether overtime is voluntary; 3. No, mention of minimum legal wage, not living wage (see page 1 & 2). Source
3. Does this Code of Conduct include the right for workers to form and join trade unions and bargain collectively; and in those situations where these rights are restricted under law, the right to facilitate parallel means of independent and free association and bargaining? Freedom of association is mentioned, but nothing found about situations in which this right is restricted by law (see page 2). Source
4. Does this labour conditions policy also apply further down the production chains, at least covering the leather production or the animal farms? VFC does not make clear if the Code of Conduct and consequent labour conditions policy also applies further down the footwear production chain, such as leather tanning or cattle farms. Source
5. Does the brand (company) have a published list of direct suppliers, that have collectively contributed to more than 90% of the purchase volume? VFC does not provide a significant list of direct suppliers on its website. Source
6. Is the brand (company) a member of a collective initiative that aims to improve labor conditions, or does the brand (company) purchase its supplies from accredited factories with improved labor conditions? VFC does not communicate any information about being part of a collective initiative or purchasing from an accredited supplier, on its website. Source
7. Do independent civil society organizations like NGO's and labor unions have a decisive voice in this collective initiative or in these certification schemes? See remark for labor conditions policy question 6. Source
8. Is there a policy for the brand (company) for capacity building at the apparel manufacturers for improved labour practices?  VFC implements its The Third Way programme at strategic suppliers to improve labour practices, and for instance, to decrease absenteeism of workers. Results such as improved efficiency by 23% for cutting, 41% for sewing and 52% for finishing and product defects decreased by 8.5%, but not with respect to improved labour conditions itself. Source
9. Does the brand (company) annually report on the results of its labor conditions policy? Is at least 90% of the brands production volume from apparel manufacturers monitored for labour conditions? VFC states to audit all its 1st tier suppliers (such as sewing, cutting, embroidery, screen-print, laundry). However, the provided information about audit results aren't specific enough. Source
10. Is at least 25% of the production volume from apparel manufacturers approved as socially compliant by independent third parties, such as FWF, GOTS or SA8000? See remark for labor conditions policy question 9. Source
11. Is at least 50% of the production volume from apparel manufacturers approved as socially compliant by independent third parties, such as FWF, GOTS or SA8000? See remark for labor conditions policy question 9. Source
12. Does the brand (company) implement a policy to establish the payment of living wages at its apparel manufacturers? Are at least first living wage payments realised? VFC reports to work closely with NGO partners, factory owners and workers to advance living wages and safer, more efficient production practices for long-term success. However, tangible results of the respective measure aren't yet reported. Source
13. Does the brand (company) annually report on the results of its labor conditions policy for the leather, yarn and fabric production phases, including a reasonable overview of the number and region of workplaces covered by the policy in relation to the total production volume? VFC states to audit all its 2nd tier suppliers (such as fabric mills or tanneries) but does not report on results of its labour conditions policy for the fabric manufacturing phases. Source
14. Are at least 50% of the brand's leather, yarn and fabric production phases approved as socially compliant by independent third parties, such as FLO-Cert, GOTS or SA8000? See remark for labor conditions policy question 13. Source